NWTF opens nature trails at Outdoor Education Center

12/15/2017


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EDGEFIELD, S.C. — The National Wild Turkey Federation recently opened six nature trails to the general public on the Outdoor Education Center portion of its 700-acre campus.

The trailhead, and accompanying trails kiosk, is located at NWTF headquarters. Here, visitors log on to trails.nwtf.org from their mobile device to sign in to use the trail systems or access maps and view notifications of trail closings. Rest assured, there are trails for everyone.

If fitness is the goal, the Whitetail Walk or the Jakes Jog trail will provide a challenge for the beginner to the advanced user. Whitetail Walk takes users alongside various types of habitats from hardwood creek bottoms to food plots and along the pollinator garden in 1.6 miles. Jakes Jog trail is shorter at 0.8 miles but offers glances at a variety of habitats.

If an advanced trail is more in order, Turkey Trot trail delivers with hills and thrills along the 2.9-mile trail.

For the nature enthusiast, Longleaf Lane and Ed’s Trail provide numerous opportunities for individuals or small groups to enjoy nature all in under a mile.

“Getting new individuals engaged in the conservation work we are doing can be accomplished through our system of nature trails with interpretive displays,” said NWTF CEO Becky Humphries. “Trail users can enjoy their time in nature but also learn about the need for diverse habitats, the types of wildlife found within different habitats, as well as the roles of our forestry and agriculture industries.”

All trails are open from 7:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. unless they have been closed for events, mentored hunts or maintenance. Dogs are always welcome to join in the fun but must remain on a leash at all times.

About the National Wild Turkey Federation
When the National Wild Turkey Federation was founded in 1973, there were about 1.3 million wild turkeys in North America. After decades of work, that number hit a historic high of almost 7 million turkeys. To succeed, the NWTF stood behind science-based conservation and hunters’ rights. Today, the NWTF is focused on the future of hunting and conservation through its Save the Habitat. Save the Hunt. initiative – a charge that mobilizes science, fundraising and devoted volunteers to conserve or enhance more than 4 million acres of essential wildlife habitat, recruit at least 1.5 million hunters and open access to 500,000 acres for hunting. For more information, visit NWTF.org.

For more information, contact Pete Muller at (803) 637-7698