Read the July-August Turkey Country and get more involved (not necessarily in that order)

The NWTF is nothing without its volunteers. And I’m not saying that just to butter their toast. It’s true.

There are NWTF members and there are volunteers. And there’s a difference between the two. Members pay their annual dues, skim through Turkey Country, maybe even drop by a local Hunting Heritage banquet. We like them too.

But it’s volunteers who really move this conservation train forward. They’re the folks who DO something about our mission. They host fundraising banquets, coordinate outreach events and get their fingernails dirty while improving wildlife habitat.

NWTF involvement: Let the magazine be your guide.

They’re the ones who have stopped making excuses as to why they can’t be more involved.

Now, I’m not going to delve into all the personal reasons that keep you from making the transition from member to volunteer. It’s not my business. Nor am I trying to make you feel guilty. (Your conscious is probably doing that for me.)

Instead, allow me to demonstrate how there’s a place in the NWTF for everyone. I’ll show you how even the most obscure people can take the volunteer plunge with the help of my little friend, Turkey Country.

Scenario No. 1: Even though you’re middle-aged, you find it’s easier to communicate with kids than adults. They speak your language, dawg!
The NWTF offers a ton of ways to chill with a younger crowd. JAKES and Xtreme JAKES events are a no-brainer. Check out Mandy Harling’s column on page 60 to find inspiration. Flip back to page 22 to learn about more NWTF-sponsored projects for youngsters, like More Kids in the Woods. Then zip over to page 41 and see what’s happening with Arizona’s JAKES Turkey Hunting Camps. NWTF chapters always need fun adults to help mold young minds on behalf of conservation, so embrace your inner child and join us.

Scenario No. 2: You’re a land baron who wanders aimlessly around your thousands of wooded acres. You’re lost, lonely and looking for ways to draw wildlife to your land.
You, sir or ma’am, are in need of a Wild Turkey Woodland Landowner Field Day. Learn how to get started on page 24. It’s like speed dating for wildlife managers. Landowners are paired with expert biologists, contractors and government plans to help with their individual habitat goals. Then comes the first site visit, which is like a first date. But don’t call it that. It creeps out the biologists.

Scenario No. 3: You haven’t been involved in politics since you ran for student council in middle school. Is there a way to get back into it AND benefit the NWTF mission at the same time?
Many state NWTF chapters have joined “camo coalitions” to make their voices heard to legislators and the like. Read page 26 to learn more. If you’re more of a take action loner, check out Shooting Straight in each Turkey Country, which highlights hunting and wildlife issues, as well as how you can get involved. Let NWTF volunteer Dave Wamer serve as your guide. Find an interview with this pro-active policy follower on page 75. Doing so may not further your political career, but it may gain you points with a wilder constituency.

So, folks, let’s drop kick any excuses for not getting involved in the NWTF. We’re happy to have you as part of the flock, even if you are a bit quirky. Heck, they’ve kept me around going on 13 years now.

 

One thought on “Read the July-August Turkey Country and get more involved (not necessarily in that order)

  1. #4 you enjoy hanging out with your girlfriends, learning new skills or honing existing ones with just women only.

    Find your nearest Women in the Outdoors group, none in your area? talk to Teresa Carroll about starting one.