Brenda Valentine’s Outdoor Legends Tour: Day 9

Let the fun begin!

We were scheduled to visit two outlying camps each day, which meant leaving out early every morning, donning heavy protective gear and hopping in a Black Hawk helicopter to ride to each location. I really enjoyed these flights, with the fresh air blowing in the open doors and the sights of the country below us.

Of course, there were capable men and women armed with machine guns pointed out the chopper doors at all times.

One of the most memorable camps we visited took us on a sightseeing tour, followed by an opportunity to shoot their artillery. As luck would have it, a sandstorm blew in at the appointed return flight time, and we were able to spend several more hours with this great group.

I’m sure my traveling companions will agree this was the most relaxing and entertaining evening of the entire trip.

Click on on the first image below to see a slideshow of all the cool hardware. If you’re a Keepin’ Up With Karen subscriber and reading this off the email that was automatically sent to you, you’ll want to click on the blog web link to view the slideshow.

Brenda Valentine’s Outdoor Legends Tour: Day 7

The Army, Marines and hunters unite!

Having never served in the military, camp life was way different than what I thought it might be … in a good way. It occurred to me early one morning, as I followed my nose to the nearest coffee pot, how courteous everyone was. Not only to me but also to each other, no matter if they were military, civilian contractors or local workers.

Early-morning joggers exchanged warm greetings. Food servers smiled sincerely. People of every rank and station exchanged pleasantries. It wasn’t just the greetings that caught my attention, but the manners and respect that often lacks in our society — small gestures such as holding doors open and addressing others as sir or ma’am.

I can truthfully say that I witnessed not a single act of rudeness during the entire tour.

 

I was especially pleased when I received permission to display the American flags I brought from home. An AMVETS post from my home state of Tennessee entrusted me to bring their flags and messages of encouragement and brotherhood to this war-torn country. There is no telling where these flags might surface some day for a good cause.

We just thought we’d been busy up to this point, but the storm was about to be unleashed.

Our group had adjusted well to the mounting air miles and 12-hour time difference. We were anxious to shake hands and exchange hunting stories with the troops.

The first camp we visited had a fine lunch followed by a lengthy meet and greet in the dining area, or DFAC as they referred to it. They presented each of us with a certificate of appreciation from the chief of staff, gave us a tour of the compound and briefed us on the state of affairs.

These folks were the epitome of hospitality. Many hailed from Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Tennessee, so I felt right at home. I wished we could have stayed longer, but our chariot was waiting and so was another camp full of service men and women who were anxious to talk hunting.

— Brenda