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JAKES Upcoming Events

Melvern Wildlife Area Youth Waterfowl Hunt - 10/18/2014

Melvern Wildlife Area, Reading Office
620-699-3372

Central Wisconsin Youth Hunters Banquet - 10/18/2014

Wisconsin Rapids Elks Lodge #693, Wisconsin Rapids
715-572-7229

Flint Hills Wildlife Refuge Youth Waterfowl Hunt - 10/25/2014

Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge, Hartford
620-203-8514

Shenandoah Valley JAKES Day - 10/26/2014

Stonewall Ruritan Grounds, Clearbrook
540-667-8858

JAKES and WITO in the Outdoors Day - 10/28/2014

Rustling Meadows Hunt Club, Berlin
920-361-4566

Turkey Shoot, Big River Longbeards - 11/8/2014

State Road 20 at Bristol City Limits, Bristol
850-447-1800

Edgefield Chapter's Mentored Dove Hunts - 11/15/2014

Wild Turkey Center, 770 Augusta Road, Edgefield
803-637-7408

2014 Deerassic Park/NWTF Youth Hunt - 11/22-23/2014

Deerassic Park Education Center and Private Properties
(740) 435-3335

Edgefield Chapter's Mentored Dove Hunts - 12/18/2014

Wild Turkey Center, 770 Augusta Road, Edgefield
803-637-7408

Brass Monkey Winter Camp - 12/26/2014

Field across from 3349 Second Street, Wayland
616-291-1740

Ken Middleton Memorial Youth Pheasant Hunt/Sporting Clays Shoot - 1/9/2015-1/10/2015

Chauncy Ranch YMCA Camp near Spring Valley
928-848-4549

Ken Middleton Memorial Youth Pheasant Hunt/Sporting Clays Shoot - 1/23/2015-1/24/2015

Chauncy Ranch YMCA Camp near Spring Valley
928-848-4549

Juniors Turkey Hunting Camps - 4/16/2015-4/20/2015

Forests near Flagstaff, Alpine or Greer and Payson
928-848-4549


Click here to find JAKES events in your area

Get Your Call On

Watch the Winchester Museum music video about NWTF's world's largest box call exhibit.

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JAKES Online Poll

Who bought your JAKES or Xtreme JAKES membership?

My parents

40.6%

I am not a JAKES or Xtreme JAKES member.

26.1%

I did

13.2%

My grandparents

12.4%

Other friend or relative

7.7%


Total votes: 613


 


Calling for Meat vs. Money

There are many theories about calling competition style and calling live turkeys. Many say turkeys would run away from competitive calling because it is not the same, while others swear competitive callers are the best afield. There is a difference between stage calling and coaxing live birds. The sounds are basically the same, but there are differences that mean success or failure in either arena.

Call on the Experts

Chris Parrish, Rod Pettit and Alex Rutledge have won national and world turkey calling titles and a truckload of awards for smaller competitions. All either guide or film turkey hunts, making them three of our nation's best turkey callers. Here are their ideas on the subject:

Chris Parrish

"Wild turkeys have differences in their voices that make them impossible to duplicate and no two turkeys have the same voice." Parrish said. "But I think the best callers learn from having conversations in the woods with actual hens. Callers in competition tend to be more perfect than actual wild turkeys. This perfect style of calling is not always successful on wild birds."

Parrish believes turkeys sound like they are making mistakes compared to skilled callers, but truthfully these unusual sounds are just part of their vocabulary.

"Beginning competitive callers make the mistake of imitating top callers instead of making sounds like true wild turkeys," Parrish said. "That is what I look for when judging competitions, but not every judge does."

Veteran callers believe competitions should return back to the roots of making real turkey sounds instead of making perfect competition sounds that you likely won't hear in the woods. But for now, perfect sounds are winning competitions.

"If you want to be a top competitive caller, start by listening and learning from live turkeys," Parrish said. "Repeat every turkey sound you like. Turkeys are like singers, some you like and some you don't. You will never imitate every turkey, but find those you are closest to in sound. Next, watch competitive callers and see how they present calls, but never try to mock the callers. Develop your own style."

Parrish recommends listening through a pair of headphones to live turkey recordings, especially before calling in competition. Turkey voices are like a song. Listen every day and you will memorize the sounds like remembering a favorite song.

Rod Pettit

Rod Pettit discovered that many of his friends took up competitive turkey calling to sound like a wild turkey and be better hunters.

"I learned what hens are saying means more than just idle noises or chatter," Pettit said. "I don't think it is humanly possible to completely match a turkey's sounds, but you can get close with lots of practice. That will eventually make you better than the average hunter. I listen to hens make different noises and add it to my two-minute competitive calling routine. Competitive calling is different because it is more constant. Calling live turkeys sometimes mean long moments of silence between producing sounds. I sometimes pause 20 minutes between calls. We use brief pauses in competition. They are considered dead spots if you pause too long."

Beware of totally imitating live hen sounds in competitions, especially speed or cadence. Pettit has heard hens make cutting sounds faster than is humanly possible, but they still occasionally break up their cadence. Cackling too fast, like wild turkeys occasionally do, is another sound that is a mistake in competition. Competition cackling or cutting is slower, more deliberate and without the pauses than live bird sounds.

"Experience is key for calling birds or contest calling," Pettit said. "Chris Parrish has the ability to listen to a competitive caller and say, 'that won't score because it is over the judges' heads, but that sound will score.' So we try to stay in the area of what sounds are pleasing to the ear, the kind of sounds that generally score big. I think this is where the beginning caller has to be careful. There are some real turkey vocalizations that won't work on stage."

Pettit cautions not to make his mistake of trying contest calling after learning how to use a mouth call without outside help. He was above average as a hunter, but eventually veteran competition callers pointed out bad calling habits that were hard to break. He eventually started over and quickly became competitive as a contest caller.

"I think an individual will find competition calling more demanding than hunting live birds," Pettit said. "It has always been that way for me. I tend to let my nerves get the best of me on stage and that makes it harder to perform. Nerves make you over-blow your calls and speed up sounds. You can relax in the woods. I would probably have won a great deal more if I could call on stage like I do in the timber where I am relaxed and sounding like a wild turkey."

Alex Rutledge

Alex Rutledge discovered the need to worry about cadence and pitch in competition calling and especially not making mistakes. But in the turkey woods, mistakes are not always bad, perhaps better than perfect competition calling. The key is knowing the difference between the two arenas.

"You call with expression and emotion when calling birds," Rutledge said. "Emotion in contest calling depends on what the judges ask for. Adding excitement, intensity, rhythm, speed and volume creates this emotion. I call this passionate calling because I am talking to the turkeys as opposed to talking at the turkeys."

Rutledge discovered through years of hunting turkeys that when calling take the cadence high and bring it down low. But in competition take the cadence from low to high and never drop back down. Emotion in the field allows you to work with cadence like a wild turkey, giving them more realistic sounds, but not the same sounds that would score high in a contest. However, he added that saying the wrong things to a turkey might quickly end your hunt.

"When you sit down and start talking to the turkey, everybody knows you start out soft and easy while checking your pitch," Rutledge said. "The turkey may be 100 yards away but if he hears you calling louder, that tells him the hen wants him more than he wants the hen, a key way to hang up a gobbler."

Rutledge agrees that listening to real turkeys when beginning competitive calling is important. Pay close attention to their rhythm and how they change from high pitch to raspy sounds. Add emotion on the stage and maintain a rhythm throughout your presentation with perfect sounds.

"To be a top competition caller, raise some domestic turkeys and listen to them in the pen," Rutledge said. "Then compare your sounds with them. Spend time in the woods and pay close attention to all turkey sounds. But beware of the emotions you will hear from live turkeys. A lot of judges will dock points for this live turkey enthusiasm."