Casalena Receives National Conservation Award

2/15/2020

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Mary Jo Casalena has long been involved in wild turkey management through her work at the Pennsylvania Game Commission, and the National Wild Turkey Federation recognized her efforts with a national award.

“I feel extremely honored to receive the Henry S. Mosby award,” Casalena said. “Never did I imagine I’d be in the ranks of past recipients, many of whom have been my mentors since I became the wild turkey biologist for the Pennsylvania Game Commission in 1999. This award actually is in recognition of my colleagues at the Game Commission, NWTF and the Pennsylvania Chapter NWTF.  We all have worked diligently together during for more than 20 years to advance wild turkey research and management in Pennsylvania with application across the US.”

Casalena accepted the Henry S. Mosby Award during the 44th annual NWTF Convention and Sport Show.

The NWTF named the award for Henry S. Mosby, Ph.D., whose research during the mid-1900s set the standard for wild turkey management. Mosby also helped found The Wildlife Society and won its highest honor, the Aldo Leopold Medal.

Casalena’s accomplishments as a turkey biologist are numerous. Her primary focus for the Pennsylvania Game Commission has been regulating turkey hunting seasons and bag limits through research to maintain robust turkey populations in the state.

Casalena is actively involved in the National Technical Committee, Northeast Upland Game Bird Technical Committee, WMU 5A Turkey Task Force and routinely attends Pennsylvania NWTF meetings, providing updates on harvests, population trends and research.

Casalena is also a dedicated and active member of her local chapter, the Juniata Gobblers.

“The NWTF is fortunate to have individuals like Mary Jo who dedicate their lives to the conservation of wildlife and habitat,” NWTF CEO Becky Humphries said. “We are proud to honor her with this award and look forward to her continued support for the wild turkey in Pennsylvania.”

About the National Wild Turkey Federation
When the National Wild Turkey Federation was founded in 1973, there were about 1.3 million wild turkeys in North America. After decades of work, that number hit a historic high of almost 7 million turkeys. To succeed, the NWTF stood behind science-based conservation and hunters' rights. Today, the NWTF is focused on the future of hunting and conservation through its Save the Habitat. Save the Hunt. initiative – a charge that mobilizes science, fundraising and devoted volunteers to conserve or enhance more than 4 million acres of essential wildlife habitat, recruit at least 1.5 million hunters and open access to 500,000 acres for hunting. For more information, visit NWTF.org.

Article State
Pennsylvania